Film, Review

Review: Deadpool

deadpool-poster-8I have never been a fan or an advocate of superhero films; the Marvel and DC universes have just never pulled me in like they have millions of other cinema-goers. Actually, I can count on one hand which superhero films I appreciate every now and then: Batman: The Dark Knight, Guardians of the Galaxy, Kickass and Deadpool = 4  / 1,000+

I was skeptical at first because it’s another film flung onto the pile of generic masculine movies about characters with extraordinary powers. I would be guaranteed…… [Click here to read more]

Life Experience, Work

I’m a Star

Feedback is crucial to a positive and high morale. It makes you feel good, let’s you know that you’re not making a tit of yourself and that you’re actually doing something right.

When you don’t receive feedback, good or bad, you become lost, disenfranchised and ultimately, downhearted about whatever you’re doing.

Look how sweet this snippet of an email is that I received today. Probably took them two minutes to write and send, and it’s made my day.

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So please, if you’re an employer, in charge or someone else, please give them feedback and let them know how they’re doing. It really matters!

Film, Review

The Princess Bride (1987)

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“Death cannot stop true love. All it can do is delay it for a while.” – Westley

*Swoon*

The Princess Bride, directed by Rob Reiner is one of the greatest love stories out there, and it’s impossible to deny that without meeting a barrage of angry fans. Described by the grandad (Peter Falk) as a tale filled with “Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles…” it’s a cult classic that has rocked many people’s worlds.

One of those lucky individuals is me.

When I was a pre-teen, Mum put on a VHS tape with no more introduction other than, ‘You will love this film, it’s one of my favourites.’ As many first-time viewers also admit, I was hooked from the start. Now I’m a sucker for a princess / fantasy / fairy tale story, but this particular piece is far more than that. As we see within the film, the grandson who is hearing the story for the first time from his grandad slowly comes around to the idea of romance, action and comedy being stitched together into one masterpiece.

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It’s one of the quirkiest films I’ve ever experienced and I have never seen anything like it since. Following the beautiful character Buttercup (Robin Wright) through her love, her heartbreak, her kidnapping, her forced marriage and her rescue, the film shows us how true love conquers all and ultimately wins. We are introduced to many exciting characters, particularly the dashing Westley, (or Man in Black as he is sometimes known) played by Cary Elwes, and the wonderful Fezzik, played by the great late Andre the Giant, alongside Inigo Montoya, portrayed by Mandy Patinkin. There are many, many amazing actors who play gorgeous characters in The Princess Bride but it would become a very long review if we were to discuss each and every one.

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One of my favourite scenes is towards the end when Fezzik, Inigo and Westley are storming the castle, with Westley recovering from being ‘mostly dead’ – one of the most hilarious concepts I’ve ever heard and seen acted out. Elwes manages to carry off the floppiest body imaginable, all the while successfully staying in character and somehow saving the day (obviously; it doesn’t count as a spoiler). The whole scene depicts three men who were not originally all on good terms working together for true love and for Buttercup’s survival. We see them work together to get into the castle and then split up to follow their own causes (with the exception of Fezzik who mysteriously disappears after Westley heads for Buttercup’s suite). Everything that the film has built up to comes to fruition in this scene and it really gets your blood pumping while still retaining its element of tongue-in-cheek comedy.

We’re presented with some pretty serious themes in The Princess bride, including suicide, torture, forced marriage, death, poisoning, yet we never feel down or miserable. In fact, we find it amusing when Westley is recovering from being tortured, and he can’t even hold up his own head; and it’s hysterical when we first hear the clergyman (Peter Cook) say “Mawage!” during Buttercup’s unwilling ceremony. As well as being incredibly funny at just the right moments, it’s also an emotional roller-coaster. My heart bleeds for Inigo on his quest to avenge his father, killed by the six-fingered man, Count Rugen (Christopher Guest), when he was just a boy. Buttercup also strikes a chord with the audience when she talks about how she died the day that word came to her that Westley was dead. The grasp on true love, whether about soul mates or fathers is perfect and every viewer can relate to one relationship or another. This film draws on every aspect of love that we are capable of feeling, from grandfather and grandson, to love/hate husband and wife, to a kingdom’s love for its future queen.

“As you wish,” Westley’s famous and only line at the beginning of the film will stay with me forever. I want it printed on everything. It means ‘I love you, and I will do anything for you’. He shouts it when Buttercup has thrown him down a very steep incline to show her that it’s him: “Oh my sweet Westley!”

*Sigh* Could this film be any more perfect?

Actually, yes.

For Christmas, Mum gave me the vinyl edition of The Princess Bride soundtrack, by Mark Knopfler from Dire Straits. I’m actually listening to it right now on Spotify which is actually proving to be an intense distraction because I just want to close my eyes and open my heart to the music.

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Reiner wanted a modern twist to the music and I think it’s already stood the test of time, almost 30 years later, being the most perfect cherry on the cake to one of the most perfect films in the world. You can see the scenes in your mind’s eye when you listen to the music, as it fits so snugly with the action. Synonymous with the visuals, the music is a movie in its own right, feeding you emotions and excitement while you try to get on with daily life.

You watch the film partly through the eyes of the grandson, seeing it for the first time, relishing in the wonderment, while not necessarily agreeing with his disgust at the kissing (depending on your age of course). It adds a childlike fascination to the film, as you occasionally check in with the pair reading the book together, and you listen to Peter Falk’s voice, it entrances you and you want to know more. What happens to Buttercup among the shrieking eels? Will Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon) get his way? Tell me more!

With vast landscapes, intricate fire swamps and beautiful castles, it’s a gorgeous film to watch, just to take in the scenery. It’s colourful and bright, different and unique. It’s one of the most quoted films since it’s debut and one of the most loved, proven by the celebrations when it reached its 25th anniversary.

If you enjoy the film, I highly recommend reading Cary Elwes’ book, ‘As You Wish’, all about his experiences in making it and how he still feels about it now. It’s a film that has a special place in the heart of its creators and actors, but also sits snugly in its fans’ hearts, including mine.

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In truth, it’s one of the more difficult films to explain, as there is so much to it, but what can be explained is the emotion that you feel when watching it. It’s a film that I love showing to friends who have not seen it and allowing them to fall in love with it as well. The perfect quotes that have been born from this film will live forever and always crop up in any situation. Just last week, Mum texted me saying “Have fun storming the castle” ten minutes before I went in for an interview (turns out on this occasion I couldn’t storm the castle, but that’s another story).

In the meantime, take Prince Humperdinck’s advice and we will look forward to the 30th anniversary celebrations next year.

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Film, Review

Review: The Maze Runner

I mean, this film is good.The-Maze-Runner-1-Sheet-250714

It’s entertaining to watch and it’s an interesting concept to consider, not unlike The Hunger Games or Divergent, adaptations of all these YA novels that are floating around in the literary cosmos as of late.

It’s also got good character development and interesting backstories to characters (even though they don’t have memories of who they are.)

I didn’t get it, though. I like the idea of throwing teenagers into a challenging environment to see how they get along but I never understood why they had to be surrounded by a maze. Alright, it demonstrates a test of their ability, but why a maze? The grassy area in the middle is surely all they need to test them. I expected the maze, being all secretive and ‘ooh nobody knows what’s in there or around it’ to be more significant and there to be a reason for its existence. Without it, it’s similar to The Hunger Games other than the fact that it explains nothing. Literally nothing… With The Hunger Games  we get given the information that we need to understand the film right at the beginning in some very simple and effective text. The Maze Runner seems to like the idea of keeping its audience in the dark for a very long time and it’s a shame that I still don’t really understand what was going on throughout.

I just have this…hatred?…for films that don’t explain themselves at the end and leave us on a cliffhanger. Maybe that’s unprofessional for someone who supposedly enjoys films but I like to be told what the dealio is.

The main character is super brave. He knows what’s up and it’s as though he’s been put there to lead the others and seemingly teach them that they can overcome whatever is growling like it’s not had breakfast for a few days in the maze. Thomas, as we later find out he is called, is the one who discovers all the ways to succeed in the maze rather than living off the fat o’ the land as the other boys have decided to do. They’ve actually got a sweet little community set up there and they all get on, which is nice for them, until Thomas arrives and riles everybody up by disturbing their peace.

I don’t agree with the female character. Bearing in mind that the only other people brought into the community inside the maze are boys and then they ho she comes along, it just seems a bit strange and unnecessary. Does it imply when she arrives with a note in her hand saying she is the last one that she is there so that they can reproduce and keep their community alive for many years? I don’t think it does. And I’m just presuming here, but why, if the establishment is exclusively for boys would you throw a girl into the mix? Is it to create some romantic drama for the onlookers? Probably not because we never see them and it’s not The Hunger Games. Is it to prove that females are as good as males? Doubtful because this particular character contributes literally nothing to the whole story and is a bit pants if you ask me. Surely the reasoning for putting one whole female into the group is to prove that she’s as badass as the lot of them and maybe provides a bit of interest for the main fella. Shouldn’t there be a clear cut reason for adding her? Otherwise, with her being as pointless as she seems to be, there might as well be a mixed bag of genders in that little experiment, something similar to what we might see in Percy Jackson.

For all intents and purposes, it’s a good watch. It’s exciting and entertaining, but it feels like they’ve tried to be too clever and then not been able to explain anything. I will be watching the next film though when it comes out in cinemas…soon, The Scorch Trials.

Entertainment, Film

Dinosaurs and the Ladies

It’s all over the cinema world at the moment and all that the dinosaurs are talking about. Jurassic World, the fourth installment in the Jurassic series with a hunky Indiana Jones archetypal protagonist and a smouldering shoulder padded lady friend. The special effects (literally the whole of the film except the people), the score and the A-list actors all scream out Hollywood jurassic-world-pratt-howardmainstream blockbuster and where that’s true, it’s also a slight understatement. Jurassic World isn’t the greatest thing I’ve ever laid eyes upon, but it certainly kept them open for a couple of hours. I normally write off big action films with a sniff and a turn of the head (Avengers, Furious 7, Transformers) but something about Jurassic World peaked my interest enough to spend £10 on a cinema ticket at 9pm on a school night(!). Maybe it’s that it kicked off in 1993 and it’s always a treat to see what they’ve done to the story and the theme (except Indiana Jones and the one we don’t talk about) or maybe it’s that dinosaurs are pretty darn cool and the trailers made me want more. It could also be the stacked Chris Pratt that made up my mind to watch the film or was it just because I didn’t want to be left out of a housemate cinema night out? All of these things contributed to me going to see it at the flicks, but nothing prepared me for what I experienced in regards to the ladies in the film.

Lady number 1) Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard) is the one behind the new dinosaur and effectively the running of the theme park. She’s sexy and intimidating, professional and comes across as a little nerdy but what gets me the most is that she is the exactdalllas_white_ opposite of a mother figure at the start. She’s awful with her nephews – barely even knows them and finds it awkward to hug them. She doesn’t understand when her sister gets upset at the idea that they’re not with her at all times and perhaps worst of all, she doesn’t know how old they both are. She’s everything that a mother shouldn’t be in Hollywood but we can see, I guess, that she identifies herself as far too young and in the middle of concentrating on her growing career. It’s refreshing (in a weirdly bad and uncomfortable way) to see a woman with different priorities however it becomes clear to us as an audience that this is not okay. It’s not alright for her to not know how to care for her nephews. She’s shamed by the mother, by Chris Pratt and by the nephews meaning that we also shame her. Her nephews choose Owen (Pratt) over her because they know that he is more likely to protect them after she abandoned them at the start of the film and come on, look at his muscles.  The film sees her turn it around, though. She becomes protective, caring, motherly and compassionate, falling at the feet of Owen and slipping into a more familiar category of female character that Hollywood portrays, the one that we know most of all.

She’s pretty badass though, running about in heels, kicking dinosaur butt and being actually helpful on their mission to save the humans on the island (including her nephews). Credit to her really. She’s typically sexy, resulting in the end of the film seeing her in a sweaty pale vest that doesn’t leave much to the imagination and a skirt with a slit up her thigh. Her hair’s all dishevelled and her eye make up is dark and smudgy, but heck, that’s what we like to see in a hardworking arse kicking lady, isn’t it? There’s not much romance, unlike most mainstream films. There isn’t really a significant moment where they realise their love for each other and have a bit of a bonk in the truck. There’s flirting though; it’s insinuated, it’s sexy. It leads us (and Owen) on, wondering if they’ll get it on. No points for guessing if they do or not.

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The other females in Jurassic World aren’t all that romantic and sexy, however, but they are badass. Take the main antagonist of the whole film, the Indominus Rex. She’s a lady and a fine one at that. She might be a hybrid and trying to kill people at every corner, but she’s smart and she knows what she wants. Like Claire, we don’t see any maternal side to her – she ate her sibling before she was even that old. She’s out to win for herself and no one else – ain’t no man gonna get in her way. Contrary to usual Hollywood typecasts, the Indominus Rex doesn’t wear heels, doesn’t flash her cleavage and doesn’t appear as a damsel in distress. Quite refreshing, I think…

Our main dino-pal is Blue, the raptor who Owen has a little soft spot for. Of course, she’s a girl, his baby, the one who ultimately he can trust. She’s sleek, fast smart and is a team player with the other raptor friends and more often than not knows which side to be on. Her blue colouring makes her stand out from the rest of them, but seeing as raptors are kinda difficult to distinguish, it makes more sense, otherwise, it could be any random reptile that decides to help out and then we wouldn’t get the sentimental value, would we? Aww.

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The last lady I want to mention because I find her quite interesting is Zara, Claire’s assistant who is given the task of looking after the nephews and following them around the park, keen to crush their fun activities by playing on her phone and being unamused at everything. Like Claire, she doesn’t get it. She doesn’t really show care for the boys or their safety; all she seems to care about is her career progression and her BlackBerry. She’s pretty and she’s randomly British, just so that you remember which one she is. She’s snooty (what are you saying about Brits, huh??) and she’s completely incapable of keeping an eye on two teenage boys. Now, something that this lady is particularly special for is that she is the star of the first female death-by-dinosaur in the Jurassic Park series. I wouldn’t say she dies with dignity and in fact, I felt sick throughout the whole thing because it is quite an ordeal, but it is significant in that she is effectively punished for not looking after the boys properly. Her incompetence is the reason they escape into out of bounds areas and then get stalked and attacked by the Indominus Rex. So what do we do to ladies that neglect their maternal duties? Kill them off, of course (except the main one because she’s obviously shown real signs of progression in her character…).

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I thought this film was great and actually had a lot of really nice gestures to the previous films in the series. It’s packed full f action and the CG is just fabulous. I really believed that those dinosaurs were there in the scenes. I suppose that’s helped by the sheer fantastic acting by the likes of Pratt and Howard; they got swag. I think they handled the female characters incredibly well (and the male ones too who deserve a blog post of their own but it’s basically my bed time now) and I think the dinosaurs would be reasonably happy with their portrayals – except the Indominus Rex, but she ain’t real, so. The film is a credit to the series, but on a side note I really hope they don’t do another. Leave it there, it’s fine as is. Having said that, I would go see this one again and again because now I know where the jump scares are and I can watch it without hiding behind my fingers.

Books, Entertainment, Review

Book Review: One Day

As I’ve said before, I have recently become an avid reader all over again and this time I discovered a book my David book-one-dayNicholls that I 100% fell in love with. One Day, you may have read it or seen the film (which I still need to watch) and you may, like me, have fallen in love with the story.

It’s about two people across twenty years and documents what happens to their relationship when they are on good terms, bad terms or no terms at all. They both go through death, new romances, shit jobs, good jobs, health problems, anything and everything that normal people experience. And it’s a rollercoaster. But for starters, when I first started reading it, I immediately felt like I could relate to the characters. The female lead, Emma, is a hard working-just graduated-student from Leeds. Check. She finally gets close to a boy she’s liked for a long time. Check. She likes art and wants something creative in life, maybe to be an author. Check. And I was thinking, okay, this is cool. They kept coming at me, more and more things that I could relate to as I read on and to be honest, it felt kind of weird. Emma is throwing a production of Oliver! when not three weeks ago my sister was in one. They go on a holiday to Greece and I’ve very recently been looking at a lot of Greek holidays. Okay, they’re getting a little weak but you get my drift. A story about two people embarking on the adventure of life after just popping out of university. That’s where I’m at now and it really interested me, to see how these characters’ lives played out and would mine turn into anything so great?

The writing is awesome. It really drew me in; I found myself wanting to know more and more about these two people who don’t even exist and also that I was laughing and crying along with them. Crazy. Considering how less than a year ago, I’d hardly even picked up a book for a decade. What I really loved though was how long the time span of the book was – twenty years is a fair amount of time to follow two people. Sharing in their experiences was wonderful and it was really nice to see some actual character development for once.

My reviews are never that deep; I don’t want to pick a book apart page by page as if I was back at school – what’s important is how I read it and whether I would read it again and the answer is a resounding yes. Now I just have to watch the film…

Review

Review: Memoirs of a Geisha

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This is a film that I’ve been looking forward to watching for a long time, but at 2hrs 26 minutes, it’s been rather difficult to find the time to watch it in one sitting. I read the book, on a whim really after being part of an English lesson where the whole class reads a book, and I was hooked. It’s such a beautiful story and when I found out that there was a film (on Netflix conveniently!) I was extremely excited to finish the book and watch the adaptation.

I was worried, though, because I loved the story so much, that the film would ruin the story and not do it justice as so many book lovers often think of films, but thankfully this was not the case. The whole film is beautiful from start to finish – each shot is artfully composed and delicately edited with the greatest care. The characters are just as well developed and you really start to fall in love with the main girl and despise the nasty geisha Hatsumomo. I love the old, artful Japanese culture that comes across and the emotion that surrounds Chiyo’s loss of her sister but the film allows you to truly admire her strive to become a geisha, after she has accepted her fate.

I mean, the one thing with films is that they aren’t as long as books can be and you can never really truly grasp the length of a time period or the tediousness of situations that Chiyo seems to find herself in, particularly as a child. It’s just how it is, but I think the film succeeded in portraying Chiyo’s life and progression accurately.

I think I would also argue that I might not have understood what was actually going on as much if I hadn’t read the book… There are an awful lot of characters and a lot of complex little things happen to Chiyo which I think I only really picked up on because I knew what was going on after having read the book. I mean, I can’t say that for sure because I can’t exactly unread it but at times I felt as though I lost where the film was at.

One thing that I was really keen on seeing how the film managed it was through the character of Hatsumomo herself because she’s painted as a true monster, beautiful on the outside and rotten on the inside. I always found her an interesting character because she’s so damn crazy and focused on destroying Chiyo’s life and I think the film really did her justice. She is portrayed as a gross geisha, a nasty girl who drinks too much and sleeps around when she really, really shouldn’t and it’s actually satisfying to see her life get destroyed because of how she behaves.

I really enjoyed the book and consequently the film; I think they made it really well considering how complex and long the story is and I am really pleased that I watched it. I feel like the film enhanced my appreciation of the story because having read it there were a lot of aspects that I didn’t really understand or couldn’t picture because I don’t have great understanding of Japanese culture. I think if you were thinking of watching it, go for it by all means, I just feel like the film and book sort of go hand in hand 🙂

Entertainment, Film, Review

Review: A Long Way Down [2014]

When you’re stuck for something to watch, Netflix can be either a blessing or a curse. In this case, itA-Long-Way-Down-Poster-slice was a curse. I spent hours trawling through the films, all of which were possible candidates for the afternoon watch, but I simply could not decide. That’s when Sam stole the remote from me and immediately pressed select – ‘Let’s watch this one.’ I had no idea what it was and when it said “When a faded TV personality decides to jump off a London skyscraper on New Year’s Eve, he meets three lost souls who had the exact same plan,” I was kind of interested but not hooked. Pierce Brosnan, though. With a weird accent. Yep.

It’s cute, it really is. The film is really nice and heartwarming (despite the theme being suicide) and it really is well made. My favourite thing about it is how it really brings out the characters that have been created and they’re so quirky that they feel real. It really makes a film when the characters are real and believable. Otherwise what’s the point?

The film looked really clean, and I love it when that’s the case. When it looks as though you’re looking through clear water at what’s going on, that’s the only way I can explain it.

There’s quite a few recognisable faces in it as well, Pierce Brosnan, Aaron Paul, Imogen Poots and Toni Collette, all famous in and around British (and US, of course) film and TV.

I would highly recommend this film for a rainy Sunday afternoon, but not necessarily as an evening watch. It’s good, and cute, but it can be quite light and sort of only scratches the surface of such a deep subject.

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Entertainment, Film, Review

Review: The Blood and Ice Cream Trilogy

Otherwise known as The Three Flavours Cornetto TrilogyThe Cornetto Trilogy or more simply, Shaun of the DeadHot Fuzz and The World’s End for those who have no idea what I’m talking about. The reason it’s known as The Cornetto Trilogy is due to the fact that during the filming of Hot Fuzz, somebody pointed out the inclusion of the ice cream and that the colours were relevant to the films – zombies: red, police: blue and then end of the world alien-but-not-alien-things: green. I was originally going to just write about The World’s End, just released not long ago, but then I thought why not lump them all together, seeing as I’ve neglected to write about the others. It’s also likely that I’ll be vlogging about The World’s End, but I have to edit that first. But now, onto the films! They’re all a result of the collaboration of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost and feature a lot of familiar faces, in case you didn’t already know, which I would be surprised about because I’m unaware of any British people that haven’t seen the first two at least… Let’s start from the beginning. Makes sense, right?

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This gem from 2004 is a…parody, if you will to the zombie flick Dawn of the Dead, which if you know me, you will know that I haven’t seen that particular film. I can barely watch this film. It’s the zombies, they just freak me out so badly. I mean, why do they have to walk like that, why?! Ahem. This is a really clever film, actually, sticking the funny into a pretty apocalyptic situation and throwing a little romance in there too. Shaun is a bit of a lame-o, shall we say; his girlfriend leaves him, his job is monotonous and so on and so forth. Funny that, monotonous. The whole point of the establishment of the film is to show us that we are already zombies with all our ‘social’ gadgets and doodahs like that. I think we’re all just bored really, aren’t we? Technology’s moving too fast, which means it’s not moving fast enough for us. Anyway. There’s plenty of hilarious points in this which are mostly made up of little references and jokes that you might not otherwise get unless you watched it for a second time. The plausibility of the zombies is irrelevant, who needs realism when there are zombies shuffling around? *Shudders* But you look past that. You want to know if Shaun and his friends and love interest will get – oh and his mum – will get to the Winchester – oh and his stepfather Phil…awkward – alive. It’s just a nice, good, British film. Never mind all these zombies occurring in America or somewhere fancy like that, I find they’re much creepier when based in London or something. Like the recent ZombieU WiiU game. That’s terrifying. Not saying I’ve played it, I’ve watched. I digress. I’m pretty confident that anybody reading this will have already seen Shaun of the Dead and will just be nodding along in agreement, in which case, good on you fella. Otherwise, go buy it on DVD; it’ll be like £3 in HMV or something and watch it. Don’t be a wuss like me, you can get past the zombies. I just about did. Just about…

8/10

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Hot Fuzz as I’m sure you’re aware, is about a cool cop from the mean streets of London being transferred to an adorable little village/town in the country called Sandford, where all the lawns are perfect, the streets are clean and nobody pisses in the fountains. But as we watch the film, we begin to realise that something is seriously wrong with this town and the people in it. Again, it’s hilarious and pokes a lot of fun at a varied amount of people: actors, the police, supermarket managers, farmers, London, all sorts. It’s also one of…well I’m not actually aware of any others…a few films that feature a grand battle in a supermarket, namely Somerfield. Does that even exist anymore? Maybe they destroyed the last one. So. We have rogue swans, bombs, Jim Broadbent, and crazy old people with guns. It’s one of the most far-fetched things I’ve ever seen (but wait until we get to the third installment of this trilogy) and I absolutely love it. It’s hilarious through and through, even if it’s a little bit gory. But there are points where it’s gory and hilarious at the same time. Gorlarious. Sure, we’ll go with that. It’s actually a really clever story and obviously, coming from Edgar Wright, it’s really cleverly made. I love how the same editing techniques pop up throughout all the films, not just because it’s the same director; it’s done absolutely on purpose. Throughout this movie we see how Nicholas Angle learns that as much as he loves his job, it isn’t the be all and end all. We see how he starts to value relationships and social interaction over his duties, especially when he’s off duty and it’s super happy in that sense. It’s just a bit darker than you might anticipate. In fact, when you think about it, it’s insanely dark, coated in nice blue colours and chocolate sprinkles. Sort of. It’s such a laugh, I swear to God, if you haven’t seen it you are crazy, where have you been??

8/10

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I think first and foremost it’s fair to say that this was one of the most anticipated movies of the year, especially for us nerdlings. I first heard about this ages ago and since then, I’ve been buzzing for it. Similar to the others, obviously, it’s hilarious. There’s a laugh around every corner, mostly with little references to the other two movies and to things that only the Brits will understand and to things that only avid movie watchers will get. It’s just clever. And it’s got a fantastic cast. It’s beautiful how you see the same actors from the other two films appear in this one, some as subtle as you can get, for example, there’s a girl in the circle at the beginning. In the circle, there’s a girl. Bilbo Baggins- I mean, Martin Freeman is also in it. WTF, right? Watch it, you’ll see. The only thing about this film (this isn’t a negative point at all) is that you have to just roll with it…you kinda just have to accept what’s going on and ignore the issue of realism or plausibility. Just watch it, accept it and deal with it. Or Bill Nighy will have something to say, I’m sure. It’s just so great. It’s so clever and I did watch it as though it was a tribute to the other two. Despite this, it can stand on its own, of course. It’s not to say that it’s useless without the other two; they’re completely different storylines. But I would advise that you go see this one quickly at the cinema before it’s gone. And if you saw it in the screening of all three of them with a free Cornetto, then good on you! Definitely watch it, deal with it and enjoy it. It’s such a good film. Cheers!

8/10